Mississippi legislative session highs include income tax cut

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Mississippi lawmakers allocated massive amounts of new state funds and a large infusion of federal funds in what was arguably one of the most impactful sessions in recent years. During the session, which ended Tuesday, lawmakers approved medical marijuana, remitted the largest income tax cut in state history and approved a major pay raise for teachers. “We’ve funded a quarter of a billion dollars for Mississippi teachers to raise them above the Southeast average,” Lieutenant Governor Delbert Hosemann said. “In addition to that, we’ve funded $40 million to improve Mississippi school buildings.” Cities and counties received $750 million for their matching funds needs to fix sewers and water and $50 million for small towns to receive a two-for-one match in water improvement projects. the water. “We’ve done things like child protective services, mental health — a whole plethora of different issues in Mississippi,” Hosemann said. “We didn’t do as well as we would have liked, but we did pretty well,” said Sen. John Horhn, of Jackson. While the city of Jackson was hoping for more help to deal with its water crisis, it is receiving millions with the promise of more to come. “We were able to secure a commitment of at least $25 million for the city’s water and infrastructure issues,” Horhn said. will be able to apply to other organizations from this pool of $750 million for sewers and water. These agencies, like Jackson, have already received money directly from the federal government for this kind of work. They will be able to use this state money as a quid pro quo to get more federal money.

Mississippi lawmakers have allocated massive sums of both new public funds and a major injection of federal funds in what was arguably one of the most impactful sessions in recent years.

During the session, which ended Tuesday, lawmakers approved medical marijuana, granted the largest income tax cut in state history and approved a major pay raise for teachers.

“We’ve funded a quarter of a billion dollars for Mississippi teachers to raise them above the Southeast average,” Lieutenant Governor Delbert Hosemann said. “In addition to that, we’ve funded $40 million to improve school buildings in Mississippi.”

Lawmakers have been buoyed by higher-than-expected revenue this year and the injection of $1.8 billion in US bailout funds. Cities and counties received $750 million in matching money needs to fix sewers and water and $50 million for small towns to receive a two-to-one match in improvement projects some water.

“We’ve done things like child protective services, mental health — a whole plethora of different issues in Mississippi,” Hosemann said.

“We didn’t do as well as we would have liked, but we did pretty well,” said Sen. John Horhn, of Jackson.

As the city of Jackson hoped for more help with its water crisis, it is receiving millions with the promise of more to come.

“We were able to secure a commitment of at least $25 million for the city’s water and infrastructure issues,” Horhn said.

The city will be able to apply with other agencies from this $750 million sewer and water pool. These agencies, like Jackson, have already received money directly from the federal government for this kind of work. They will be able to use this state money as a quid pro quo to get more federal money.

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